SPE

Extra! Extra! Energy4me Has a Newsletter!

We are pleased and excited to launch the first edition of the Energy4me Newsletter! As you know, we’re the Society of Petroleum Engineers’ (SPE) global energy education outreach program offering factual educational resources to students, teachers, and the general public.

Published quarterly, the Newsletter will keep past workshop participants, educators, and SPE members updated with the latest information on resources and materials regarding energy education.

We also provide you with up-to-date information about upcoming educator and student workshops, volunteer and scholarship opportunities, and career profiles!

In short, the Newsletter is for you and anyone you know interested in energy education!

Sign-up to receive our newsletters HERE!

View the first Newsletter: HERE!

Watch our Energy4me promo video HERE!

Join the conversation on Facebook— www.Facebook.com/Energy4me. You can also connect with us on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Energy4me!

 

Space? Petroleum Engineering? Yes, There’s a Connection!

Just like with any industry, there is always an eye to the future. This also rings true regarding the future of petroleum engineering. In the March issue of the Journal of Petroleum Technology (JPT), an article titled “Exploring the Deep Earth and Deep Space: What role does the petroleum industry play?” dove deep into the subject.

The article has interesting points about the future of petroleum engineering in space including how exciting hydrocarbon discoveries of mind-bending quantities are being made in the far reaches of our solar system and even in our own Milky Way galaxy. 

It also references a new paper by scientists on NASA’s Cassini-Huygens mission, which finds that blocks of hydrocarbon ice might float upon the surface of existing lakes and seas of liquid methane, and ethane on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. 

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Keeping alive the interplay between advances in understanding deep Earth, deep space, and the needs of the petroleum industry may lead us to a future shaped more by the intersection of these pursuits. 

What do you think? Would you take your career to space?

Send us a note to energyed@SPE.org if you would like a copy of the article.

Join the conversation on Facebook— www.Facebook.com/Energy4me. You can also connect with us on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Energy4me!

Energy Drives Canada, Energy BOT Squad

Canada is home to many oil and gas resources and an abundance of energy education enthusiasts. Energy4me held teacher workshops in Canada in 2012 and have plans to hold similar type events in 2013! 

We came across a pretty cool resource we wanted to share with you: The Energy BOT Squad! Powered by the Centre for Energy, The Energy BOT Squad is 10 BOTS, one for every major energy source in the country. With these members of Canada’s Energy BOT Squad, you can discover how they power your home, your car, your city and your life! 

PICK A BOT and learn details about solar, oil, gas, coal, geothermal and more!

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Inspirational Engineer, Abhijeet Kulkarni, Nominated for New Faces of Engineering

Let’s celebrate awesome… and inspirational!

17-23 February 2013 is Engineers Week! Every year, since 2003, members from participating engineering societies nominate colleagues 30 years or younger for consideration as one of the New Faces of Engineering, a highly coveted honor. SPE (Energy4me’s supporting organization) nominated Abhijeet Kulkarni of Shell Denmark.Abhijeet_Kulkarni Colour

Kulkarni, 30, is a reservoir engineer whose work is constantly informed by his all rounded approach towards his organization, environment and the future. He is currently involved in a project to enhance oil and gas production from the existing North Sea fields. He is a voluntary member of the Earth Watch team that has studied the impact of climate change in the Arctic. As chairman of SPE Young Professional program, he inspires the youth as he mentors and spreads awareness about engineering.

Click HERE to learn more about Eweek!

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Congrats to the 2013 Nico van Wingen Memorial Graduate Fellowship Recipients!

The Nico Van Wingen Memorial Graduate Fellowship is an annual fellowship award for SPE members at the Ph.D. level intending to pursue careers in academia. Each university that has an SPE Student Chapter and offers a Ph.D. degree in petroleum engineering may nominate one candidate.

The fellowship namesake, Nico van Wingen, played a major role in the development of oil production technology in the US, Austria, Canada, West Germany, Iran, Turkey, and Venezuela. He was active on many SPE committees and won the Anthony F Lucas Gold Medal and SPE Distinguished Member award in 1985.

In 2013, two outstanding individuals are recipients of the award: Orhun Aydin of Stanford University and Mojtaba Shahri of Tulsa University. Congratulations to them both!

AYDIN_photoAydin is a PhD student in the Energy Resources Engineering Department at Stanford University. He has received a Master of Science Degree in Energy Resources Engineering Department at Stanford in 2012. He received his Bachelor of Science at the Middle East Technical University in Turkey. Orhun was awarded the SPE STAR Scholarship during his last year at Middle East Technical University. 

Currently, Aydin is a research assistant at the Stanford Center for Reservoir Forecasting (S.C.R.F.), where he works with Professor Caers on model complexity to answer how complex we need to make earth models or reservoir models to make decisions. Outside of his responsibilities as a student researcher, he is also the treasurer of the Stanford Student Chapter of SPE.

Shahri is a PhD student at the University of Tulsa. He received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Petroleum Engineering in 2008 and 2010. He earned the 1st rank in both undergraduate and graduate studies 2008 and 2010 among all the students. Mojtaba also ranked 1st in the University of National Entrance Examination of Graduate Program. Mojtaba has more than twenty publications in different journals and conference related to Petroleum Engineering and also served as technical reviewer in petroleum engineering related journals. He has been awarded as the 2012 Henry Dewitt Smith Fellowship recipient in the world as well.Mojtaba Pordel Shahri

Shahri is currently conducting research on the coupled fluid flow-geomechanical modeling of reservoirs for predicting reservoir stress path under supervision of Dr. Miska and Dr. Yu at the University of Tulsa Drilling Research Projects (TUDRP).

For more information about the Nico van Wingen Fellowship go here.

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Energy Education Happening Globally at SPE Events!

Did you know that Energy4me energy education events are held globally in conjunction with events, SPE sections, and SPE student chapters?  Below is more information on upcoming Energy4me workshops and activities! Get involved!

 

Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference (ADIPEC) 2012 –http://www.spe.org/events/adipec/2012/pages/schedule/young_members.php 

Education Week – 9-13 November 2012: This four day programme is for the benefit of the best undergraduate geosciences and engineering students from international institutions. It is anticipated that some 60-80 students will be selected to attend the program. Students’ expenses will be fully covered through sponsorships. The purpose of this programme is to give the students a clear insight into the industry that they are about to join; to allow them to return to their universities and colleges with a positive story to relate to their fellow students; and to provide opportunities for students to form new friendships and to work together on joint activities. 

Teachers Workshop – 13 November 2012: Teachers’ workshop will be focused on educating the teachers about the energy world. SPE will ensure that educators will receive comprehensive, objective information about the scientific concepts of energy and its importance while discovering the world of oil and natural gas exploration and production. A variety of free instructional materials will be available to take back to the classroom. 

Education Day – 14 November 2012: Education Day is an initiative to introduce students to the discipline of petroleum engineering, and the industry in general. Targeting High School Students, (Grade 10 to Grade 12), invited industry professionals will share their experience with students and deliver talks on topics of general interest and relevance to the industry. The students will be given free access to the exhibition area during ADIPEC. They will be able to see firsthand the high end technology used by engineers and the sophisticated software available for solving many engineering problems. It is hoped that they will leave the conference with a better understanding of what petroleum engineers do and their role in the broader community. Equally important, they will also become aware that a petroleum engineering career is full of challenges, teamwork and responsibilities. 

Additionally, there will be “Education Days” at the below upcoming SPE events: 

SPE Middle East Unconventional Gas Conference and Exhibition (UGAS) 28-30 January 2013 – http://www.spe.org/events/ugas/2013/index.php 

SPE Middle East Oil & Gas Show and Conference (MEOS) 10-13 March 2013 – http://www.imexmanagement.com/show/70/meos-2013/

 

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How Kids Teaching Kids Works in My Classroom

 

Guest blog by Jeannine Huffman, CTE Energy & Design Instructor, San Joaquin County Office of Education – Stockton, CA. Courtesy of The NEED Project.

How did Jeannine Huffman convince her students to not only want to learn about energy content, but remember it as well? Her strategy was kids teaching kids… read more in this fascinating blog post!

At the end of the school year my high school students know energy transformations, energy sources, and electricity generation by heart. In fact, when Pacific Gas and Electric sent a team to help students conduct an energy audit, the professionals said that our students were the only students they had ever worked with who could name every form and source of energy, each transformation, and how electricity was generated.

How did I accomplish this? I first had to convince my students at the beginning of each year to want to learn and remember the energy content.  I did this by introducing them to the Learning Pyramid. I have known about the Learning Pyramid, but have not had an opportunity to fully put its method into action until I began using NEED curriculum. I have grown more and more convinced that the Pyramid is representative of the belief that when Kids Teach Kids they retain and apply the content more effectively.

How does it work in my classroom?  I post the Learning Pyramid Chart and refer to it during class, reminding the students that our goal is to reach the top. At the bottom of the chart is Lecture 5%, so I say to my students, “If I stand up here and lecture, you will only remember 5%. In fact, you probably wonder how you are ever going to remember everything.” Student buy-in is critical and right away they see on the chart that they will only remember 10% if they read along with my lecture. As students move up the chart, adding visuals to reading and lecture, the retention increases to 20%. This affords the students a chance to tap into their meta-cognitive skills which means they are thinking about their own learning and taking personal responsibility to examine how they learn.

Demonstrations help students remember a concept but it has been suggested that they will only remember 30%.   How do I know this? When asked to explain energy transformations, or energy flow from the sun, most cannot explain the concept completely. Allowing students to discuss in groups and as a class may increase their retained knowledge up to 50%.  As a teacher you will reap rewards, and they will too, by allowing them to discuss and collaborate.  It is OK for a classroom to be noisy.  Science and technology aren’t silent.   After demonstrations and discussion about half the class can explain the energy flow well.

When students practice by doing, the retention can increase to 75%.  Through repetition, most students are able to easily explain the energy transformation. Let your students experiment, explore and work in teams. It is more work for you to set up multiple labs, but the return on the investment of teacher time is significant.  NEED’s hands-on kits (wind, solar, Science of Energy and more) come with equipment for demonstrations and experiments like the Hand Generated Flashlight that students use to see how motion energy transforms to electrical energy.  Hands-on learning always requires more investment of time in the classroom, but it pays off in student performance and classroom success.

The biggest return on the investment is when students are afforded the opportunity to teach others. This is not a surprise to NEED teachers. For example, once you became a teacher, your first lecture on electrons made much more sense and led to more personal understanding.  The same holds true for your students. Unless they can explain each step accurately, they do not really understand the concept. What a perfect way to assess your students on the spot! The work that goes into preparing to teach a class prepares students for energy presentations and other academic presentations they will give throughout the year. It is an effective, and fun, way to bring important concepts about energy out of the classroom and into the community.  Teach each other, teach others.

What is the gain by taking extra classroom time for every student to teach each other? A whopping 90%.  I believe it! There is a great deal of satisfaction in observing them as they teach and as I assess them informally.  Once students are trained in this method, they know they do not leave the classroom until they have taught others. By the time the student teams have practiced and presented lessons, they have heard the concepts better than they ever expected.  Moreover, students seem to compete with one another to see who can give the best presentation! The classroom becomes a truly cooperative learning space and students all pay better attention, are more engaged and accountability and responsibility for learning skyrockets.  One freshman, who was struggling to grasp a concept after several attempts to explain, finally had an AH HA! moment and said, “I will never forget this!” This is what a teacher lives for!

To embed this knowledge, I reinforce regularly in a playful way. Out of the blue I will say, “I just heard a noise outside who can trace that energy flow from the sun?” Hands shoot up as students have become very aware of energy around them.

This about this:  I was talking with my niece about teaching electrolytes in my chemistry class. My niece said, “I memorized what the definition of an electrolyte was and passed my chemistry class last year, but I can’t even tell you what it is now.” This statement disturbed me. How many of us are good at memorizing facts but still don’t know how to apply that knowledge? Teach them to teach and they will never forget!

I love the NEED curriculum.  But it is only recently that I have come to realize the importance of the motto, “Kids Teaching Kids.” It was not until I had firsthand experience with the Learning Pyramid that see and know how well it works.

Learn more about the NEED project at www.NEED.org

Join the conversation on Facebook— www.Facebook.com/Energy4me. You can also connect with us on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Energy4me

Energy4me, Energy Education, and Volunteers a Recipe for Success

Written for Ignite Magazine, below is a guest article about Energy4me, volunteering and the importance of energy education. Great read!

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Energy is a critical issue worldwide and education about energy is important to keep the industry growing.  The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) encourages its members to educate the public about energy and put a face on the industry. SPE saw a need to provide teachers with factual, unbiased information that can be used in classrooms worldwide to spread the word about energy conservation and the future of the oil and gas industry.

 In order to meet this need, SPE created Energy4me, an energy education programme that provides energy resources to educators, teaches about careers in petroleum engineering, and discusses industry challenges. It was designed to make an impact through classroom and website resources, teacher development, and speaker programmes. 

Front Row (Left to Right): Lewis Milne, Michael Fernyhough. Back Row (Left to Right): Colin Black, Jennifer Kirk, 2012 SPE President, Ganesh Thakur.

The Energy4me resources include a kit with classroom materials created by teachers for teachers, and have been tested in a classroom environment. The kit contains ready-to-go presentations, classroom activities, lesson plans, and hands-on experiences to demonstrate the dynamic process of the discovery of oil and gas and how it shapes our lives. Many of the materials are available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.  

Free one-day teacher workshops are held at select SPE conferences. Each event covers age-specific, hands-on energy lessons and activities, offers a keynote speaker from the industry, and includes a technology tour. For their participation in the workshops, teachers receive the Oil and Natural Gas book, an information-filled book on the history and uses of oil to take back and use in their classroom. 

The Energy4me programme also holds student STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) workshops for secondary students at select SPE conferences. Students see firsthand the exciting opportunities the energy industry can offer by touring the latest state-of-the-art technology, meeting industry professionals, and participating in hands-on activities. These events also give students the chance to learn about emerging technology in the petroleum industry, career opportunities, or how energy makes an impact on our everyday lives. 

Participation from SPE members is fundamental to the success of the Energy4me programme. Members are encouraged, worldwide, to serve as classroom speakers, science fair judges, lead students and teachers in educational activities at select SPE conferences, and career fair exhibitors, as well as donate materials to schools. 

Colin Black, Optima Solutions UK Ltd Director and SPE School Career Guidance Chairman of the Aberdeen Section, is doing his part to give back to the Energy4me programme. He has organized a partnership with SPE, the Satrosphere Science Centre, and the Aberdeen City Council to develop the Energy4me Development project that aims to promote and enhance the learning and teaching of energy topics in primary schools in Aberdeen and throughout Scotland. 

“Energy education is vital to the future of our industry and it is important that we take the time to create a fun learning environment for students,” Black said. “By partnering SPE with the Satrosphere Science Centre and the Aberdeen City Council we have been given the opportunity to develop a programme that will make the difference in the lives of many students and hopefully entice them to pursue a future in the oil and gas industry.” 

Representatives from SPE, the Satrosphere Science Centre, and three teachers from the Aberdeen City schools worked together to develop an Energy4me pack, a useful and relevant educational resource that complements and supports curriculum for Excellence experiences and outcomes. It includes five lessons that meet the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence but can still be used anywhere in the world with modifications.  The lessons have been trialed in schools and were then refined and amended before the final version was produced for publication. 

Following a launch event to release the Energy4me pack, a continuing professional development session will be organized for local teachers. They will be given the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with the materials and activities prior to engaging their students. SPE volunteers will contribute to the training sessions and will also provide assistance in the classroom when the materials are introduced. The materials will be distributed in schools upon completion of the training sessions.

Want more information on Ignite Magazine? Email us at energyed@spe.org

Join the conversation on Facebook— www.Facebook.com/Energy4me. You can also connect with us on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Energy4me 

 

SPE’s Ghana Section is committed to energy education!

The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), Ghana section, is growing and gaining momentum! With a growing membership and an enthusiastic board, they have made the commitment to make a difference in the oil and gas industry while doing something good for their community. The Ghana section will be supporting 10 schools in Accra and 10 schools in Takoradi with energy education materials including energy4me books and kits as well as classroom presentations.

SPE encourages all its members and sections to educate the public about energy and put a face on the industry. Energy is a critical issue worldwide, and SPE believes face-to-face contact is the ideal way to spread the word about energy conservation, the future of the oil and gas industry, and its impact on the planet.

The energy4me books and kits donated to the Ghana section were sponsored by energy4me, SPE’s energy education outreach program, and Colin Black, SPE EIC member and Director, Optima Solutions UK Ltd.

SPE and energy4me would like to thank the Ghana section in their energy outreach initiatives. Together, we can make a difference by sharing the facts about energy with the public and putting a face on the industry.

Keep up the good work!

Learn more about energy and energy careers.

The picture to the right shows the SPE Ghana board members and British High Commissioner, Mr. Peter Jones.

First Annual “New Faces of Engineering College Edition” Winners!

The National Engineers Week Foundation and partners honor top college engineering students by recognizing the most promising engineering professionals of tomorrow with their first annual New Faces of Engineering College Edition program.

Fifteen engineering students in their third, fourth, or fifth year were selected. Winners are recognized for academic excellence, leadership within student organizations, outstanding communication skills, non-engineering related community service and involvement in the engineering industry.

Moustafa Ezzat, a 5th year student from the British University in Egypt and student member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), was among the winners.

Since 2003, National Engineers Week Foundation has honored young engineering professionals with its New Faces of Engineering award.  This is the first year the popular initiative has expanded to recognize the best and brightest college engineering students.

Congratulations Moustafa Ezzat!

New Faces of Engineering College Edition is live on Facebook (www.facebook.com/collegeedition).  The page provides a source of academic and professional development opportunities available to students from National Engineers Week Foundation’s engineering association, university, and corporate partners.  Students can meet with their engineering peers in every field and learn about other events, internships, jobs, competitions, engineering associations and more.

Funding for New Faces of Engineering College Edition is provided by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). For more information, visit www.eweek.org.

Learn more about engineering careers.